AECCafe: “NCMH Secures All-Star Jury for 2017 Matsumoto Prize”

A unique awards program honoring Modernist residential design, sponsored by North Carolina Modernist Houses.

Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic Paul Goldberger joins the 2017 jury.

Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic Paul Goldberger joins the 2017 jury.

North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) announces the blue-ribbon jury for the 2017  George Matsumoto Prize for North Carolina Modernist residential architecture.

Among the seven jurors, representing internationally known architects, critics, and designers, is Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic  Paul Goldberger. From 1997 through 2011, Goldberger was The New Yorker’s architecture critic. Today he is Contributing Editor at Vanity Fair, for whom he weighed in on the controversy surrounding the Cherry-Gordon house in Raleigh’s historic Oakwood neighborhood. In the article  “Is This House Too Modern To Exist?” he praised the Cherry-Gordon house and called NCMH “a wonderful preservation organization.” READ MORE…

NCMH Secures All-Star Jury for 2017 Matsumoto Prize

A unique awards program honoring Modernist residential design, sponsored by North Carolina Modernist Houses.

Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic Paul Goldberger joins the 2017 jury.

Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic Paul Goldberger joins the 2017 jury.

North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) announces the blue-ribbon jury for the 2017 George Matsumoto Prize for North Carolina Modernist residential architecture.

Among the seven jurors, representing internationally known architects, critics, and designers, is Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic Paul Goldberger. From 1997 through 2011, Goldberger was The New Yorker’s architecture critic. Today he is Contributing Editor at Vanity Fair, for whom he weighed in on the controversy surrounding the Cherry-Gordon house in Raleigh’s historic Oakwood neighborhood. In the article “Is This House Too Modern To Exist?” he praised the Cherry-Gordon house and called NCMH “a wonderful preservation organization.”

The 2017 jury will also include:

  • Carl Abbott, FAIA, of Carl Abbott Architect, Sarasota FL
  • Curt Fentress, FAIA, RIBA, of Fentress Architects, Denver CO
  • Robert Miller,FAIA, of Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, Seattle WA
  • Ron Radziner, FAIA, of Marmol Radziner, Los Angeles CA
  • Susan Saarinen, ASLA, of Saarinen Landscape Architecture, Golden CO
  • Harry Wolf, FAIA, of Wolf Architecture, Los Angeles CA

Founded by NCMH in 2012, the George Matsumoto Prize is named to honor the architect who designed many exemplary mid-century Modernist houses in North Carolina, and who serves as honorary jury chair each year. The Matsumoto Prize is a unique design competition featuring $6000 in cash awards and online public voting. It is the only design awards program in the state exclusively honoring Modernist residential architecture. Submissions will open in May 2017.

For more information, including submission guidelines, keep checking http://www.ncmodernist.org/matsumotoprize.htm. To see the 2017 jury and winning submissions, visit http://www.ncmodernist.org/prize2017.htm.

 

New Podcast Promises Casual, Lively Discussions About Modernist Architecture

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US Modernist Radio brings celebrities and local luminaries to the studio

 

North Carolina Modernist Houses announces the launch of US Modernist Radio, a casual, amusing, and informative podcast series dedicated to lively discussions about Modernist architecture.

“Make no mistake, US Modernist Radio is not a stuffy, academic diatribe,” says host George Smart, NCMH founder, whose side-kick for the podcast is national comedian Frank King. “Listeners will hear interesting and expressive people who enjoy, own, create, dream about, preserve, love, and even hate Modernist architecture, which we believe has created the most exciting and, yes, controversial buildings in the world.”

To that end, Smart has assembled a series of discussions with guests that

Vanity Fair architecture critic and author, Paul Goldberger

Vanity Fair architecture critic and author, Paul Goldberger

mix national luminaries by phone with local preservationists and advocates in the studio. National figures include actress and modernist homeowner Kelly LynchVanity Fair’s celebrated architecture critic Paul Goldberger, the Avett Brother’s cellist and Modernist homeowner Joe Kwon, and architect Sarah Susanka, author of the popular Not-So-Big House book series.

A few local guests include architect Milton Small, whose father designed many exemplary mid-century Modernist structures in the Triangle region; Louis Cherry and Marsha Gordon, who recently withstood a storm of controversy over the Modernist house they built in a Raleigh historic district; Myrick Howard, executive director of Preservation North Carolina, Inc.; and architects Robby Johnston and Craig Kerins of The Raleigh Architecture Co. who designed and built Joe Kwon’s house on an urban infill lot in downtown Raleigh.

Via iTunes or Libsyn, US Modernist Radio subscribers will automatically receive new shows every two weeks. The first three podcasts are available now. For more information, go to www.usmodernist.org.

US Modernist Radio is an initiative of North Carolina Modernist Houses, the award-winning non-profit organization dedicated to archiving, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design across the state. For more information, visit www.ncmodernist.org or contact George Smart at George@ncmodernist.org.

> Download and subscribe on ITunes: itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/us-modernist-radio

> Download for Android or PC: usmodernist.libsyn.com

 

VANITY FAIR: “Is This House Too Modern To Exist?”

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By Paul Goldberger

 

Lewis Mumford wrote that, in a city, “time becomes visible.” Not, it would appear, in Raleigh, North Carolina, where a city board has just decided that a rather discreet and understated modern house needs to be torn down because it damages the ambience of a historic district, which is to say it destroys the illusion that the neighborhood is a place in which time has stopped.

It’s actually a little more bizarre than that. Louis Cherry, a respected Raleigh architect, and his wife, Marsha Gordon, had long liked the Oakwood neighborhood, a pleasant, older section of town not far from the center of Raleigh, and a couple of years ago they bought a parcel of land on Euclid Street, in the heart of what is called the Oakwood Historic District. Oakwood is not the kind of historic district you would find in, say, New Orleans, where the buildings are of pretty much the same style and the same period. It’s a mix of 19th- and 20th-century houses, of varying size, style, and quality, and construction there is overseen by the Raleigh Historic Development Commission, which, working under pre-determined design guidelines for historic districts, opines on whether or not it considers plans for new construction in the district appropriate….

….The state [has] a wonderful preservation organization called North Carolina Modernist Houses that focuses on educating the public about modern design and saving endangered houses. The organizers have taken up the Oakwood cause—the first time, I suspect, that they have ever had to fight to preserve a modern house before it was even finished. READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE HERE