Public Voting Starts July 8 For The Matsumoto Prize

George Matsumoto, FAIA

The public is invited to vote in a unique North Carolina architecture competition.

June 25, 2012 (Durham, NC) — For the first time ever in a North Carolina architecture competition, the public will serve as a juror. Sponsored by Triangle Modernist Houses, the Matsumoto Prize recognizes recent achievement for Modernist houses within North Carolina.

The Matsumoto Prize is named for George Matsumoto, FAIA, a preeminent Modernist architect who will serve as Honorary Chair for the panel of professional jurors.

The public is encouraged to vote as well. Anyone in the world can vote via email, one time per email address. According to George Smart, TMH’s founder and director, the competing submissions will be posted on the TMH website, www.trianglemodernisthouses.com/vote.htm. Complete rules are on the site. Public voting will be open July 8 through 22.

To encourage Modernist home designers’ participation, TMH is awarding unprecedented cash prizes to the winners chosen by a jury of professional architects and the public: $3000 for first place, $2000 for second, and $1000 for the third place winner. The three houses that receive the most public votes also receive a special commendation.

TMH’s objectives in creating the Matsumoto Prize is “to expand the public’s awareness about the great inventory of North Carolina Modernist houses, to showcase the skills of the North Carolina residential design community, and to inform the public that great design can be well within a homebuyer’s reach,” said Smart.

“These entries will inspire people dreaming of a Modernist house to know Modernist design is affordable, efficient, sustainable, and most importantly, a house their families will love decades,” he added. “By using an architect or designer, you can have a house, or you can have a great house, for the same budget.”

For more information on the Matsumoto Prize, go to www.trianglemodernisthouses.com/prize.

Raleigh Architecture Firm To Host “Thirst4Architecture”

Louis Cherry, Ratio welcome networking happy hour.

June 11, 2012 (Raleigh, NC) — Triangle Modernist Houses (TMH), the award-winning non-profit organization dedicated documenting, preserving and promoting Modernist residential design, will continue its 2012 Thirst4Architecture (T4A) happy hour networking events this month on Wednesday, June 20, from 6-8 pm. in the offices of RATIO, an architectural firm in downtown Raleigh. RATIO partner Louis Cherry, FAIA, will serve as host.

TMH’s informal happy hours are free and open to the public. Hosts provide refreshments and TMH provides a variety of door prizes.

“We welcome architects, artists, designers, interior designers, realtors, engineers, contractors, property investors, building managers, Modernist homeowners, materials and furniture dealers – or anyone with a huge crush on great architecture,” says TMH founder and board chair George Smart. “T4A focuses on building relationships, generating passion about good design, creating strategic alliances, and connecting people to each other. There are no presentations or PowerPoint slides. Come join the fun and make new friends and contacts!”

For more information on this and future T4A events, visit www.trianglemodernisthouses.com/t4a.

With offices in Illinois and Indiana, RATIO merged with Cherry’s former firm, Cherry Huffman Architects, in 2011. The firm’s Raleigh office is located at 135 E. Martin Street, Suite 101, Raleigh, NC 27601 (919-821-0805). For more information visit http://www.ratioarchitects.com.

For more information on Triangle Modernist Houses, visit www.trianglemodernisthouses.com.

News & Observer: “Tar Heel of the Week: George Smart, saving modernist homes”

June 3, 2012

George Smart (N&O photo by Takaaki Iwabu)

by Marti Maguire

The history of architecture is marred with cases of belated appreciation. Think Victorian mansions pushed aside to make way for interstates, or Gothic buildings torn down and replaced with gleaming, tinted-window skyscrapers.

But George Smart, founder of the nonprofit Triangle Modernist Houses, wants to save the state’s little-recognized modernist legacy from the wrecking ball. READ MORE…