TMH Presents The Max Isley House Tour

The 1968 Max Isley House Tour

December 30, 2009 (DURHAM, NC) – On Saturday, January 9, from 10 a.m. to 12 noon, Triangle Modernist Houses (TMH), an award-winning educational archive for modernist residential design, will host an exclusive tour of a Durham home designed by architect Max Isley. The architect and his wife Jane, who lived there only a few years, will be on hand to discuss the house with the public.

An exemplary modernist residence, the Isley house features an open floorplan, vaulted ceilings, and an abundance of large windows for natural lighting and to blur the line between interior and exterior. To see photographs, go to www.trianglemodernisthouses.com/isley.htm.

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TMH Hosts Exclusive “I-House” Tour

December 26, 2009 (YOUNGSVILLE, NC) — If your idea of a mobile home is a flimsy metal trailer with ugly air conditioning units sticking out the windows, think again.

Clayton Homes has introduced a mobile home – or manufactured home, as they’re now called – that is as Modern (with a capital “M”) as it is environmentally friendly, and that has enthusiasts of both sensibilities lining up for tours across the country.

On Monday, December 28, George Smart of Triangle Modernist Houses.com (TMH), will host an exclusive preview of the new “I-House” at the Clayton Homes location in Youngsville, NC, starting at 6 p.m.  “About 25 people have signed up so far,” says Smart.  The Youngsville location is the only store in this part of the state featuring the I-House.

From its “butterfly” roofline, abundance of windows, and “flex room” connected by an outdoor living area, to its sleek built-in cabinetry and ultra-modern fixtures and furnishings, the new I-House brings a level of architectural sophistication to the manufactured home industry that has never been seen before.

Even more innovative are the I-House’s multiple “green” features that introduce environmental stewardship to the industry. On the exterior, the I-House features solar panels, energy-efficient windows, sustainable/low-maintenance siding and roofing, a rainwater collection system, and decking made of recycled materials. On the interior, the I-House features bamboo floors, tankless (or on-demand) water heaters, dual flush toilets, low-flow faucets, Energy Star appliances and no V.O.C. (volatile organic compounds) paints for indoor air quality.

“Mike Johnson, Clayton’s Homes’ manager, is staying open late just for us,” says Smart, “and folks are excited to see what Clayton has to offer.”

The tour is free but participants are asked to contact Smart in advance to get on the list. Contact Smart at george@trianglemodernisthouses.com.

For more information on the I-House, visit www.claytonihouse.com.

For more information on Triangle Modernist Houses, visit www.trianglemodernisthouses.com.

About Triangle Modernist Houses:

Triangle Modernist Archive, Inc. (TMA) is a North Carolina nonprofit organization committed to preserving, restoring, and growing modernist architecture.  Our primary public service is Triangle Modernist Houses (TMH), an award-winning, nonprofit educational archive for modernist residential design. TMH also hosts popular modernist house tours, design films, and trips several times a year, giving the public access to the Triangle’s most exciting residential architecture, past and present.  These events raise awareness and help preserve these works of art for future generations.  For more information visit www.trianglemodernisthouses.com.

Triangle Modernist Houses Spotlights Pioneering Women in NC Architecture

December 21, 2009 (DURHAM, NC) — Women make up half of all students in American graduate schools of architecture today, according to a New York Times report, and roughly 20 percent of the profession, according to the American Institute of Architects.

That was not the case from the 1940s through the 1970s. In 1975, women represented only 1.2 percent of the profession.  Design schools were heavily dominated by men through those decades, as were architecture firms, most of whom only allowed women in their offices as secretaries, if at all.

George Smart of Triangle Modernist Houses.com (TMH), an award-winning website devoted to archiving and promoting modernist residential design in North Carolina, has uncovered stories from early women designers and architects as they braved prejudice and often ridicule to pursue their careers.  Smart, TMH founder, researched early women architects and drafting professionals in the state to showcase their accomplishments via an online feature entitled “Pioneering Women of NC Architecture.”

“As with most professional jobs in the 20th century, architecture and construction was just for men.  With few exceptions, like wartime, it was often incredibly difficult for women get trained and hired.  It was ‘Mad Men’ for real,” Smart said.

“Out on the job site, the men treated me badly at first,” Jean Middleton of Durham told Smart for her profile. A former artist and model, Middleton studied drafting at Durham Technical Institute and worked in City Planning in Chapel Hill until 1973. During that time, the men she encountered on job sites “would go out of their way to curse, urinate in my general vicinity, and argue when I pointed out their mistakes, probably trying to prove that women had no business on the job site.”

Middleton’s profile is just one several currently online, with seven more planned for early 2010.  So far, “Pioneering Women of NC Architecture” includes:

Mary Olive Johnson, a Fuquay-Varina, NC, native who graduated from the NCSU School of Design in 1969. She worked for Odell Associates in Charlotte and says of that experience, “They gave me every opportunity imaginable – except that women were not allowed to go out on the job sites.” She left architecture in 1985 to work in the nonprofit sector for the YWCA and Habitat for Humanity.

Constance Grottola Mitchell, who transferred into the all-male architecture program at Catholic University in Washington, DC, in 1956. As a member of what is now Calloway Johnson Moore and West in Winston-Salem, NC, she worked on the restoration of the Municipal Building in Asheville and the main administrative building at the NC School for the Deaf in Morganton, NC.

Anne Kathleen Tennent, a graduate of Canterbury College (now Kent College) who came to Salisbury, NC, in 1958 as part of a sister cities exchange program with Salisbury, England. She and her husband, Douglas Tennant, worked for John Ramsay, FAIA, of Salisbury before forming their own firm, Tennent & Tennent Architects.

— Dorothy Morton Abernethy, a Raleigh native and the third woman to graduate in architecture from the NCSU School of Design. After working at Colonial Williamsburg and with the National Park Service, she returned to NCSU to study horticulture. She now works for the Blue Ridge Parkway in Asheville.

Margaret King Hunter (1919-1997), a member of the first class of women architects at the Harvard School of Design in 1942. She and her husband, architect Edgar Hunter, authored books, taught and designed buildings for Dartmouth College, and relocated to Raleigh from New Hampshire in 1966. She was the third woman to be registered as an architect in North Carolina.

Georgian Pope Yeatman (1902-1982), an English immigrant and the very first woman to be registered as an architect in North Carolina. She was initially denied graduation at the University of Pennsylvania because the university refused to issue an architecture degree to a woman. She received her architecture degree instead from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1925 and moved to Beaufort NC.  By the 1960s she became one of North Carolina’s largest farm owners.

Smart invites suggestions on other women architects and designers who worked in North Carolina before 1970 at george@trianglemodernisthouses.com.

To read the current profiles, go to www.trianglemodernisthousescom/ncwomen.htm.

For more information on TMH, visit www.trianglemodernisthouses.com.

About Triangle Modernist Houses:

Triangle Modernist Archive, Inc. (TMA) is a North Carolina nonprofit organization committed to preserving, restoring, and growing modernist architecture.  Our primary public service is Triangle Modernist Houses (TMH), an award-winning, nonprofit educational archive for modernist residential design. TMH also hosts popular modernist house tours, design films, and trips several times a year, giving the public access to the Triangle’s most exciting residential architecture, past and present.  These events raise awareness and help preserve these works of art for future generations.  For more information visit www.trianglemodernisthouses.com.

Modern Architecture Advocate/Archivist To Appear on NYC BlogTalkRadio Show

George Smart, founder/director, Triangle Modernist Houses

December 10, 2009 (NEW YORK, NY) – What is “modernist” residential design and why is it so important to preserve it? George Smart, founder and director of Triangle Modernist Houses.com, will answer these questions and many more when he appears as Larry Lane’s guest on “Sharing the Passion of Architecture,” a BlogTalkRadio show emanating from New York City. The show will air Monday, December 14, beginning at 5:30 p.m.

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NC State Alumni Association Blog: NC State’s Influence on Modernist Architecture

December 2009

By Chris Richter

The News & Observer ran a Q&A on Sunday with George Smart, who runs the excellent Web site Triangle Modernist Houses. It provides an incredible catalog of modernist architects and homes, with a focus on this area (and with lots and lots of great photos).

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE

New Raleigh.com: Architecture Film Series

November 2009

Triangle Modernist Houses has announced its first Architecture Movie Series. This four-part, monthly series will take place on Thursday nights at Galaxy Cinema in Cary, and is sponsored by Nowell’s Furniture. Advance tickets are $7.95 each, or $23.95 for all four films. They can also be purchased for $9.00 at the door, presuming of course that they don’t sell out.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE

Business Leader: Triangle Modernist Houses’ Director Receives Elite Award

October 2009

George Smart, Jr., founder and executive director of Triangle Modernist Houses.com, has received a 2009 City of Raleigh Sir Walter Raleigh Award for Community Appearance. The awards ceremony was held October 7 at the Fletcher Opera Theater in the Progress Energy Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Raleigh.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE